First Gen Part 2

Hi everyone! I hope you all are having a great week. So, this is part two of my three-part series. In this post, I will be talking about what it’s like living in two different worlds.
I live in one country, but I am a part of two different worlds. All I have ever known is the U.S. I have never lived anywhere else, and I don’t see myself living in another country. Virginia is my home, but I also have to remember where I come from. I have Mexican and Guatemalan heritage, but I’m also an American citizen. Being a part of two worlds is great for some people, but for others, it can be confusing because it feels like there is a choice that has to be made. Fortunately for me, I have already had that journey, but getting to where I am now was not easy.

I grew up in the U.S. as an American citizen but, because I have Hispanic parents, I am immediately put in the minority group, yet I identify myself as an American who happens to have Hispanic heritage. This is the part that confused me as a child. I felt that I had to act like an American to society, such as speak good english but also show I am still Hispanic to my family and relatives.

The unbalance of not know where I belong or if I belong, took a toll on myself esteem and confidence, and feelings of doubt consumed my every thought. As I matured, I realized that it’s not society’s choice of where I belong and who I am but what I choose to identify myself as. And that is a citizen of the United States with Hispanic culture. Who I am is my experiences, beliefs, and religion, which is Hispanic and American.

Below I have attached an article I read that inspired me to write this post

https://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-hispanic-heritage-month-20160916-snap-htmlstory.html

2 thoughts on “First Gen Part 2

  1. Thank you for being vulnerable throughout your posts! It really allows me to gain perspective and understanding!

    Like

  2. Thank you for sharing! I think its so unfortunate that individuals from different countries don’t feel comfortable speaking their language in America. I think it says a lot about the people here.

    Like

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