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The Segregated Prom—Why Privatization Won’t Work As Long As We Live With Idiots

You may have seen articles discussing this shocking development in the news last week. Yes, the Wilcox County High School in Georgia has a segregated prom, a segregated limo rental service and tuxedo rentals. Not in the 1950s—right now, as in this year. I’ll let that sink in for a second…

Ok. So, how can this happen? Segregation has been illegal in schools for over 50 years. Ah…but since the Wilcox County High School prom isn’t school sponsored, the parents who do fund it have the final say. And they say that they want to continue to be racist and ignorant.

Now, it would be easy to rant about this wacky and morally repugnant occurrence, but that isn’t why I write this post. I want to talk about larger issues of government and privatization, and what the Wilcox County High School prom means on a bigger scale.

sw prom

I’d like my proms with more Star Wars and less racism, please.

I used to believe a bit more in privatization. I happened to buy the argument that most things worked better without government intervention. This idea can also extend to social issues. Why force people to donate money via taxes to help others? Couldn’t they just donate to local institutions like churches and shelters? After all, these community institutions are actually situated in the communities that they are helping. Surely, they know the people of their area better than Uncle Sam does, right? Right?

Well…kinda. While that church may be better able to understand their community than a government agency can, there is also the little issue of bias. What happens when a person is in need of help, but their lifestyle does not jive with the private institution providing aid? What happens when the unwed mother who recently had an abortion comes by in need of food and a place to stay at that Catholic Church providing assistance? What happens to the black family that goes to the food bank sponsored by the KKK?

twist

“Sorry kid, you just don’t fit the moral code of this private institution. Find some charity somewhere else!”

Ok…my examples may seem like crazy hyperboles. And they are. But the point is, things like this can happen when you have potentially biased institutions providing social help. What the government version of welfare programs provides is an equitable hand. The intent is that judgment and bias are removed. Will tax dollars getting funneled into government programs ever be as efficient as a bunch of community members donating taxes to that church down the street would be? Probably not. But the loss of efficiency must be accepted in order to gain fair treatment for all.

But, but, but, what about the people that don’t support these programs? Why should people HAVE to pay for things they don’t approve of? Plenty out there don’t want to support welfare programs.

Two words—tough shit.

I don’t want to support an offensively based military force, which spends more money on unnecessary tools of death than the next 13 countries combined. But don’t worry, it only ends up being about 2.2 million dollars per minute. That’s the way democracy works, though. There is an ebb and flow. We all pay for things we want, don’t want, and don’t care about. Deal with it.

Print

Words fail me…

Back to the racist Georgia prom—a perfect example of privatization gone wrong. I’ve long seen it argued that if McDonalds (or whatever major chain you want) randomly decided that it would stop selling food to say, Asian people, the public backlash and free market would quickly force them to change. Therefore, we don’t need protections under law for people; we just need a free market. But what happens in the case of a prom? Black students can boycott, but the prom isn’t a business. What can we do?

We can fund schools, first and foremost. Things like this shouldn’t happen. And they won’t happen as long as we give schools the funding they need. While it can be argued that prom isn’t essential, it is a rite of passage for young people. When it gets “privatized” like in Georgia, we get Wilcox County. We get the 1950s all over again.

See, economics relies on rational actors. We hope and think that we live in a world in which people are past this. I’d imagine that in some places, we are. However, situations like this story show just how far we have yet to go.

rational

I write this post to point out just why we need government. There are people out there that continually make arguments against things like affirmative action, equal pay for women, and legal protection of sexual preference, among others. We may like to believe that inequality is a forgotten relic of the past, and that the free market can sort out injustice, but it simply isn’t true. And if you don’t think so, you can head down to Wilcox County for living proof of social injustice.

unity

3 Responses to “The Segregated Prom—Why Privatization Won’t Work As Long As We Live With Idiots”

  1. bauerjc

    Thought-provoking post. I have often felt like I would like to see fewer laws and legal interventions – that people would just help one another all on their own. But, given the widely divergent views on morality and ethics in this country “help” often comes with a clause or catch. I also think that as long as privilege remains hard to see and challenge, and as long as people are unwilling to give up unearned privilege to promote equity for everyone – we need a social structure that will help out.

    Reply
    • jgrand50

      Agreed. In theory, I would much prefer to live in a world where we didn’t have a ton of laws and government intervention. I decided to write about this subject because it has long been something I’ve been conflicted about. Where do we draw the line between practice and theory?

      We hear all the time that we don’t need legal protections like affirmative action. I just felt that this story shows very clearly that we aren’t there yet.

      Reply
  2. Kelly J.

    Good points Justin!! It amazes that some of the laws and ideas that the government pushes for are still around. It confuses and upsets me that so many of these laws that are fought for are to only restrict more and more groups of people. Our government should be a body that is to HELP our society and country…not demote the progress we’ve made over the years for equality and fairness. Nice job!

    Reply

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